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Showing posts from August, 2018
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Limpid

Limpid [ LIM-pid ][ adjective ]MEANING :1. transparent, crystal clear
2. lucid and simple
3. calm, serene or free of stressUSAGE EXAMPLE 1 :The limpid waters of the Caribbean draw tourists from all over the world.

enamoured

enamoured [ i-NAM-erd ][ adjective ]MEANING :charmed, captivated or marked or characterized by unreasoning, silly or foolish fondnessUSAGE EXAMPLE 1 :He was a fool, enamoured with the idea of country living.
USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :Renault's two-time world champion Fernando Alonso is another of those enamored of the greatest track left in F1.

Overweening

Overweening [ OH-ver-WEE-ning][ adjective ]MEANING :1. brash, arrogant or conceited
excessive or overbearingUSAGE EXAMPLE 1 :His best qualification for the job was his overweening ambition, nothing else.

Kismet

Kismet [ KIZ-mit, -met, KIS- ][ noun ]MEANING :fate, luck or destinyUSAGE EXAMPLE 1 :He owed his success to hard work instead of his kismet.

Sarcophagus

Sarcophagus [ sahr-KOF-uh’-guh’ s ][ noun ]MEANING :a coffin made of stone that usually bears sculptures or inscriptionsUSAGE EXAMPLE 1 :The sarcophagus was found surrounded by artefacts made of precious metals.

Sanguinary

Sanguinary [ SANG-gwuh’-ner-ee ][ noun ]MEANING :1. bloody or involving bloodshed
2. blood thirsty, cruel or murderous
3. composed or consisting of bloodUSAGE EXAMPLE 1 :The sanguinary witnessed in Syria horrified the world.

Sanctimonious

Sanctimonious [ sangk-tuh’-MOH-nee-uh’ s ][ adjective ]MEANING :feigning piety or pretending to be holy or righteousUSAGE EXAMPLE 1 :His sanctimonious attitude cost him many a friends.

Sang-froid

Sang-froid [ Fr. Sahn*-fr*wa* ][ noun ]MEANING :calmness, composure or equanimityUSAGE EXAMPLE 1 :The sang-froid displayed by the athlete in the face of imminent defeat was commendable.

Travail

Travail [ truh'-VEYL, TRAV-eyl ][ noun, intransitive verb ]MEANING :1. (n.) toil or laborious work
2. (n.) anguish, torment, hardship or agony
3. (n.) labour or pain of childbirth
4. (intr.v.) to be in labour
5. (intr.v.) to toil or work laboriouslyUSAGE EXAMPLE 1 :       The story made a mockery of the travails faced by the people of the past century.

Metaphysical

Metaphysical [ met-uh'-FIZ-i-kuh'l ][ adjective ]MEANING :1. pertaining to philosophy and its more abstruse branches
2. being concerned with ultimate grounds and first principles
3. being based on theory or speculative reasoning
4. supernaturalUSAGE EXAMPLE 1 :Perhaps Kant was correct when he said that although we can never hope to answer our metaphysical questions, we can't help asking them anyway.

Beguile

Beguile [ bih-GAHYL ][ transitive verb ]MEANING :1. to deceive by trickery or influence by flattery
2. to take away from by deceiving or cheating
3. to charm, divert or distract
4. to amuse or delight
5. to pass time in a pleasant mannerUSAGE EXAMPLE 1 :He beguiled the voters with his good looks.

Scrimmage

Scrimmage [ SKRIM-ij  ][ noun, intransitive verb ]MEANING :1. (n.) a vigorous struggle
2. (n.) a practice game
3. (n.) a skirmish
4. (intr. v.) to engage in a rough struggleUSAGE EXAMPLE 1 :There was a considerable scrimmage, with tourists anxious to leave the island after the earthquake.

Profusion

Profusion [ pruh’-FYOO-zhuh’ n ][ noun ]MEANING :1. abundance or lavish supply
2. extravagance, lavishness or unrestrained expenses
3. prodigality, wastefulness or great liberalityUSAGE EXAMPLE 1 :A rich profusion of flowers added to the appeal of her house.

Irascible

Irascible [ i-ras-uh-buh l ][ adjective ]MEANING :1. very irritable; short-tempered
2. marked or produced by anger or hot temperUSAGE EXAMPLE 1 :She was cautious, as she knew that she was dealing with an irascible and difficult client.

Amorous

Amorous [ AM-er-uh' s ][ adjective ]MEANING :1. strongly disposed, attracted to or fond of love esp. making love
2. enamoured or being in love
3. suggestive of, indicating or expressing love
4. associated with or pertaining to loveUSAGE EXAMPLE 1 :She reported his amorous advances at work.

Plenary

Plenary [ PLEE-nuh'-ree ][ noun, adjective ]MEANING :1. (adj.) complete or absolute
2. (adj.) attended by all qualified members or fully constituted
3. a meeting at which all members are presentUSAGE EXAMPLE 1 :Many members objected as the vote was not taken at a plenary meeting.

Variegated

Variegated [ VAIR-ee-i-gey-tid, VAIR-i-gey- ][ adjective ]MEANING :1. multicoloured or having streaks or patches of various colours
2. varied or diverseUSAGE EXAMPLE 1 :Snorkeling swimmers at Australia's Barrier Reef can catch an inspiring glimpse of giant clams, sharks and variegated coral.

Nonpareil

Nonpareil [ non-puh’-REL ][ noun, adjective ]MEANING :1. (adj.) not having any equal
2. (n.) someone or something that has no equalUSAGE EXAMPLE 1 :Agatha Christie is widely regarded as a nonpareil among best selling novelists.

Potpourri

Potpourri [ poh-poo'-REE POH-poo'-ree ][ noun ]MEANING :1. a mixture of spices and petals of fragrant flowers
2. a musical medley
3. a collection or a mixture ofUSAGE EXAMPLE 1 :A gentle fragrance emanated from the jar of potpourri in her bedroom.

Conspicuous

Conspicuous [ kuh’ n-SPIK-yoo-uh’ s ][ adjective ]MEANING :1. noticeable, observable or obvious
2. unusual, outstanding, striking or egregiousUSAGE EXAMPLE 1 :I've often seen bloggers and other webmasters place a wishlist in a conspicuous corner of their page.

Abnegation

Abnegation [ AB-ni-gey-shuh'n][ noun ]MEANING :1. self denial in favour of the interests of others
2.the denial and rejection of a doctrine or belief; "abnegation of the Holy Trinity"USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :The children were taught the value of abnegation from a young age.

Shibboleth

Shibboleth [ SHIB-uh’-lith, leth ][ noun ]MEANING :1. a word or phrase that sets apart a group or class of persons
2. a catchphrase, slogan, catchword or password
3. a peculiarity of style of dressing, behaviour or pronunciation that sets a group apart from the restUSAGE EXAMPLE 1 :Bizarre or not, uncritical attachment to old shibboleths inexorably yield contradiction.

Quirk

Quirk [ kwurk ][ noun, transitive verb ]MEANING :1. (n.) an idiosyncrasy, whim, or peculiar mannerism or trait
2. (n.) a sharp turn or twist
3. (n.) an accident or vagary
4. (n.) a subterfuge, shift or quibble
5. (tr.v.) to form with a twist or curve
6. (adj.) formed with a curve or twist.USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :They accepted her attitude as one of her little quirks.

In extenso

In extenso [ in eks-TEN-soh; in ik-STEN-soh ][ adverb ]MEANING :at full lengthUSAGE EXAMPLE 1 :The newspaper covered their speeches in extenso.

Herpetologist

Herpetologist [ hur-pi-TOL-uh'-jist  ][ noun ]MEANING :1. one who studies reptiles and amphibiansUSAGE EXAMPLE 1 :By profession she was a herpetologist, a biologist specializing in reptiles and amphibians.

Doldrums

Doldrums [ DOHL-druh'mz ][ noun ]MEANING :1. stagnation or a state where there is no activity
2. a slump or a period of depression
3. a region of the ocean near the equator, characterized by light winds or squalls.USAGE EXAMPLE 1 : The mortgage market has been in the doldrums for last three years now.

Cauterize

Cauterize [ KAW-tuh'-rahyz  ][ transitive verb ]MEANING :1. to burn or sear for curative purposes
2. to deaden feelings or moral scruplesUSAGE EXAMPLE 1 :They cauterized the bullet wound to stop the bleeding.

Dogmatic

Dogmatic [ dawg-MAT-ik, dog- ][ adjective ]MEANING :1. dictatorial or authoritative
2. pertaining to dogmaUSAGE EXAMPLE 1 :She was not tempted to be dogmatic about what she believed.

Amnesty

Amnesty [ AM-nuh'-stee  ][ noun ]MEANING :1. a general pardon for political offenses
2. an act of forgiveness or of granting pardon for past offensesUSAGE EXAMPLE 1 :An amnesty for political prisoners was on the cards after the signing of the treaty.

Palindrome

Palindrome [ PAL-in-drohm ][ noun ]MEANING :a word, sentence, phrase, or verse that reads the same backward and forwardUSAGE EXAMPLE 1 :Madam is an example of a palindrome.

recumbent

recumbent [ ri-KUHM-buh’ nt ][ noun, adjective ]MEANING :1. (adj.) reclining, leaning or resting
2. (adj.) inactive, resting or idle
3. (n.) one who is idle or inactiveUSAGE EXAMPLE 1 :The thief was fooled by the recumbent police officer into thinking that he could escape.